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Scott E. Raub, D.O.
DoctorReviews.com
Specialties: 
Back, Neck, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Spine

When it comes to dealing with back pain, the key is knowing how to optimize your life. For example, Dr. Raub learned to ski later in life, but now skis most weekends and enjoys the bumps. Optimizing your life means recognizing your limitations and maximizing your potential with reasonable compromise, like spending time in the gym, avoiding the crowds and reducing speed.

This holistic approach is one aspect of what a doctor of osteopathy is trained to do: understand the physical condition within the context of the whole person, including psychological, social, and emotional factors. In addition to four years of medical school, Dr. Raub completed special training in physical medicine therapies, allopathic remedies, and pain management. He completed his fellowship in sports medicine in 1994 before joining Vail-Summit Orthopaedics in 1999.

As a physiatrist, Dr. Raub uses a variety of diagnostic tools to pinpoint the true source of spinal pain, providing the shortest route to the most effective treatment plan. Spinal pain is particularly difficult to pinpoint, given the density of nerves in the spinal region and the fact that the perception of pain is highly subjective.

Dr. Raub is quick to point out that 90% of spinal conditions do not require surgical treatment; however, success is measured in degrees of improvement rather than total restoration. The fact that there are no “biological restorative treatments” or “cures” for spinal injuries means that the patient plays an even bigger role as an active participant in creating good results.

Given the importance of patient participation, Dr. Raub spends much of his time educating patients, and collaborating with the community of back pain therapists (physical therapists, massage therapists, chiropractors, and personal trainers). Dr. Raub emphasizes an interventional approach to back pain, minimizing drugs whenever possible.

Dr. Raub enjoys practicing in a mountain environment where people place a high priority on maintaining an active lifestyle well into their senior years. This youthful attitude is a powerful tool in achieving positive outcomes for spinal patients.

Education & Training

  • Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology: University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
  • Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine: Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Lauderdale, FL
  • Internship: Suncoast Hospital, Largo, FL
  • Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residency: Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL
  • Sports Medicine Fellowship: Lutheran General Hospital Sports Medicine Center, Park Ridge, IL

Certification

  • Board Certification: American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
  • Board Certification: American Osteopathic College of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
  • Certificate of Added Qualification in Pain Management

Professional Associations

  • American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
  • Spinal Intervention Society (SIS)

Hospital Affiliations

  • Vail Valley Medical Center
  • Summit Medical Center
  • Peak One Ambulatory Surgery Center
  • Vail Valley Surgery Center

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Here is a look at our final back pain myth... Myth #10: An MRI always gives us the answer for the cause of pain.

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10 Back Pain Myths: Myth #9

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Myth 9: Prolonged bed rest is necessary following an acute episode of lower back...

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10 Back Pain Myths: Myth #8

Myth 8: A cure exists for all spinal pain problems; “I can be fixed!”

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10 Back Pain Myths: Myth #7

Here is the next myth in our series on common back pain myths.

Myth 7: All steroids are bad for me

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10 Back Pain Myths: Myth #6

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Myth 6: Spinal injections...

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10 Back Pain Myths: Myth #5

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Myth 5: You will never have to modify your...

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10 Back Pain Myths: Myth #4

Myth 4: Medications are the best way to manage lower back pain

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10 Back Pain Myths: Myth #3

Myth 3: If I see a Spine Specialist I will most likely end up with an operation

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10 Back Pain Myths: Myth #2

Myth 2: Where it hurts is where the pain comes from

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10 Back Pain Myths: Myth #1

There are 10 common myths surrounding back pain. Here is the first:

Myth 1: Disc degeneration is a disease

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All of our doctors were recently featured in Becker’s “Orthopedic Specialist to Know” section. 

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Overcoming Back Pain

An estimated 10 million adults suffer from chronic or recurrent back pain each year. Care of back pain is one of the top reasons to see a doctor....

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“I went to Dr Raub with a C6/C7 herniated disc. It was the most debilitated I've ever been. Didn't sleep, couldn't work. I'm a very active person; before the herniation diagnosis, I was skating a nordic marathon every weekend. That period was one of the most depressing in my life. Scott gave me an injection, prescribed therapy, and demanded that I not run (>30 mile runs) for six months. It was difficult to respect that, but I did. Since last season, I've run four ultras, placing top 3 in two of them. Attached (oops: can't upload due to 2MB limitation) of me running the Grand Canyon (South Rim to North Rim to South Rim = 42 miles) last fall. I could not have done any of these without his professionalism and realistic approach to my condition. However, I have had to make some life changes. I don't skate ski anymore because I fear its return and I never sleep without a cervical collar. But these are small sacrifices. I never take pain meds and, only occasionally, do I pop a Meloxicam instead of ibuprofen. Thank you VSO!
– Zack W.