top of page

VSON DOCTOR

Meet Dr.
Scott Raub

AREA OF SPECIALTY

Spine, Back, Neck, Physical Medicine, & Rehabilitation

About Dr. Raub

When it comes to dealing with back pain, the key is knowing how to optimize your life. For example, Dr. Raub learned to ski later in life but now skis most weekends and enjoys the bumps. Optimizing your life means recognizing your limitations and maximizing your potential with reasonable compromises, like spending time in the gym, avoiding crowds, and reducing speed.

 

This holistic approach is one aspect of what a doctor of osteopathy is trained to do: understand the physical condition within the context of the whole person, including psychological, social, and emotional factors.

 

In addition to four years of medical school, Dr. Raub completed a residency training in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Pain Management. He completed his fellowship in sports medicine in 1994 before joining Vail-Summit Orthopaedics in 1999.

 

As a physiatrist, Dr. Raub uses a variety of diagnostic tools to pinpoint the true source of spinal pain, providing the shortest route to the most effective treatment plan. Spinal pain is particularly difficult to pinpoint, given the density of nerves in the spinal region and the fact that the perception of pain is highly subjective.

 

Dr. Raub is quick to point out that 90% of spinal conditions do not require surgical treatment; however, success is measured in degrees of improvement rather than total restoration. The fact that there are no "biological restorative treatments" or "cures" for spinal injuries means that the patient plays an even bigger role as an active participant in creating good results.

 

Given the importance of patient participation, Dr. Raub spends much of his time educating patients and collaborating with the community of back pain therapists (physical therapists, massage therapists, chiropractors, and personal trainers). Dr. Raub emphasizes an interventional approach to back pain, minimizing drugs whenever possible.

 

Dr. Raub enjoys practicing in a mountain environment where people place a high priority on maintaining an active lifestyle well into their senior years. This youthful attitude is a powerful tool for achieving positive outcomes for spinal patients.

VSON_Vail_Doctors Headshots_3_29_23-18.jpg

Associated Team Members

Darcy Beck, ATC

Dr. Raub Serves These VSON Locations

  • Golfer's Elbow
    Overview of Condition: Golfer's elbow is a condition that impacts the tendons in the forearm. It is a common overuse injury found in athletes whose sports involve swinging or throwing movements, such as golf or tennis. Members of the workforce who perform repetitive arm motions are also susceptible to golfer's elbow. The routine gripping, flexing, and swinging motions cause tears in the elbow tendons, causing pain and tenderness in the inner elbow, elbow stiffness, and weakness, tingling, and numbness in the hand, wrist, and fingers. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: If diagnosed properly, most golfer's elbow patients can treat their condition nonsurgically. At Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery, our expert elbow physicians often recommend conservative treatments, such as icing, bracing, and physical therapy. However, if left untreated, the tendon can become damaged and need to be surgically removed.
  • Elbow Fracture
    Overview of Condition: Elbow fractures occur when a bone in the elbow joint breaks, usually resulting from a direct blow to the elbow, accident, or a fall. This injury can cause severe pain, bruising, swelling, deformity, and instability in the elbow joint. It can also impact your ability to rotate or bend your arm. All elbow fractures should be seen by an orthopaedic elbow specialist who can diagnose the location and severity of the fracture. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Elbow fractures are categorized as displaced, when the bone has fragmented and is out of alignment, or non-displaced, when the bones are still in the correct position. Non-displaced elbow fractures can often be treated nonsurgically with immobilization, pain medication, and physical therapy. However, displaced elbow fractures may require surgery to ensure the bones heal properly and in the correct alignment. Elbow fracture surgery could include bone grafting, joint reconstruction, and repair of the surrounding tendons and ligaments.
  • Elbow Bursitis
    Overview of Condition: The elbow (olecranon) bursa is a fluid-filled sac at the boney jut of the elbow that protects the bones, muscles, and tendons in the joint. Overuse or injury can cause the bursa to become inflamed. This is known as elbow bursitis. While elbow bursitis can affect anyone, it is more prevalent in people who perform physical jobs, athletes whose sports require them to make repetitive elbow and arm motions, musicians, and people with arthritis. The symptoms of elbow bursitis can appear suddenly or gradually and worsen with time. Elbow bursitis symptoms include pain, swelling, and discoloration around the elbow joint, making it painful or difficult to perform daily activities. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: The first step in treating elbow bursitis is appropriately diagnosing it. Elbow bursitis is easily mistaken for tennis elbow. Proper diagnosis requires an orthopaedic professional specializing in elbow conditions. At Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery, our elbow specialists will take the time to understand your symptoms, review your medical history, and examine your elbow. How elbow bursitis is treated will depend on the nature of your injury. Elbow bursitis caused by an infection will be treated with antibiotics, while traumatically-induced bursitis may require your arm to be immobilized or excess fluid to be drained. Only in very rare cases is surgery necessary for elbow bursitis.
  • Elbow Dislocation
    Overview of Condition: The elbow joint is composed of three bones: the humerus, ulna, and radius. An elbow dislocation occurs when the joint bones move out of alignment, causing pain, deformity, instability, and immobilization of the elbow. Swelling, inflammation, numbness, and bruising can also accompany this type of injury. In the majority of cases, an elbow dislocation is the result of a fall, but trauma such as a car accident or sports injury can also lead to the dislocation of the elbow. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Elbow dislocations are characterized as simple or complex, and treatment for this injury will depend on the associated damage to nearby structures. Most simple elbow dislocations can be treated nonsurgically with splinting and physical therapy. However, if the nearby tendons and ligaments have been damaged or bone fragments are present, surgery may be required to realign and repair the joint. Our orthopaedic elbow physicians are experts in repairing damaged tissue and restoring elbow function and are dedicated to working with patients to find the surgical option that's right for them.
  • Elbow Arthritis
    Overview of Condition: Elbow arthritis can result from overuse, age, inflammation, or disease. It occurs when the slippery, cushioning cartilage between the bones in the elbow joint becomes damaged or worn away, resulting in bone grinding on bone. Patients with elbow arthritis often report pain in the elbow and a cracking or grinding sensation in the joint. Elbow stiffness, swelling, tenderness, and limited range of motion are also common. The symptoms of elbow arthritis can worsen over time, making everyday tasks severely painful. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: At Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery, our orthopaedic elbow specialists will always attempt to treat elbow arthritis nonsurgically. This could involve activity modification, anti-inflammatory medication, and physical therapy. If elbow arthritis does not respond to conservative treatment methods, our doctors may recommend surgery to relieve your painful symptoms and get you back to the activities you love. Our doctors will work with you every step of the way, designing a treatment plan that fits your lifestyle and outcome goals.
  • Lateral Epicondylitis (Tennis Elbow)
    Overview of Condition: Lateral epicondylitis, also known as tennis elbow, occurs when the tendons that run along the outside of the elbow become inflamed. This type of overuse injury is often found in adult athletes, ages 30 to 50. Racquet sports players, weight lifters, and baseball players are commonly diagnosed with tennis elbow, as are painters, plumbers, and carpenters. This is because the repetitive motions of the wrist and arm can overload the tendon in the elbow, causing it to swell and (sometimes) tear. Patients with tennis elbow often report pain along the outside of the elbow, weakened grip, burning in the forearm, and difficulty straightening the wrist. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: The majority of tennis elbow conditions can be treated conservatively. At Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery, our orthopaedic elbow experts will always attempt nonsurgical intervention before recommending surgery. This could include bracing, physical therapy, or steroid injections. However, if the condition has progressed past conservative treatment, our doctors may need to remove the damaged tissue surgically. VSON physicians discuss all treatment methods with their patients, taking their lifestyle and outcome goals into consideration.
  • Chronic Foot and Ankle Conditions
    Overview of Condition: Chronic foot and ankle conditions are persistent issues of swelling, pain, and stiffness that worsen with time. Oftentimes these are the result of a past orthopaedic trauma that never properly healed. For example, chronic ankle instability typically stems from a history of severe ankle sprains. Ankle arthritis can develop because of a past fracture that damaged the joint cartilage or just a lifetime of active living. Other common chronic foot and ankle conditions treated at Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery include compartment syndrome and Morton's neuroma. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Sometimes chronic foot and ankle conditions can be treated conservatively with physical therapy, custom shoes, or steroid injections. However, when the pain has progressed to the point where everyday movement is painful and nonsurgical methods fail to produce results, it's time to discuss surgery. Dr. Elton will discuss your unique condition, lifestyle, and outcome goals and work with you to design a treatment plan that restores your quality of life.
  • Foot and Ankle Overuse Injuries
    Overview of Condition: Our active outdoor population is full of people who love running, biking, skiing, and snowboarding. However, when athletic enthusiasm exceeds the body's ability, people can experience overuse injuries. Overuse injuries occur when the body is not given enough time to adapt to increased stress. Common overuse injuries in the foot and ankle include: Plantar Fasciitis Stress Fractures Sesamoiditis Achilles Tendonitis Plantar Plate Injuries Symptoms of foot and ankle overuse injuries often begin gradually and increase with time. People who attempt to "push through the pain" will often find their condition has progressed to the point where it impacts their day-to-day movements. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: If caught early, overuse injuries in the foot or ankle can be treated with rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE). In more serious cases, Dr. Elton and his team may prescribe physical therapy, bracing, or shoe inserts. Very rarely do overuse injuries require surgery, and the foot and ankle team at Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery will only recommend surgery if all other treatment options have been exhausted.
  • Traumatic Injuries of the Foot and Ankle
    Overview of Condition: Traumatic injuries of the foot and ankle are often the result of a quick twisting motion, forceful impact, or fall. These can strain muscles, tear ligaments, rupture tendons, and even break bone. Common traumatic foot and ankle injuries include: Foot and Ankle Fractures Ankle Sprains and Strains Achilles Tendon Tears Lisfranc Injuries Syndesmosis Injuries If you've experienced a traumatic injury to the foot or ankle, it’s essential to see a foot and ankle expert for proper diagnosis. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Treatment for a traumatic foot or ankle injury will depend on the severity of the condition and the patient’s outcome goals. Mild injuries, such as sprains, can be treated nonsurgically. Misaligned fractures and complete tendon tears typically require surgery to heal properly.
  • Foot Deformities
    Overview of Condition: Foot deformities, such as flat feet, can appear at birth or develop over time, like hammertoes and bunions. Footwear and athletic activities can also play a role in forming foot deformities. Deformities don't always impact a person's quality of life, but severe cases can lead to pain, difficulty moving, and even tear the tendons and muscles of the foot. Left untreated foot deformities can cause neck, back, knee, and hip pain. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: In the majority of cases, foot deformities can be treated conservatively. Shoe inserts, bracing, and physical therapy can relieve the painful symptoms of flat feet, while custom shoes, splinting, and shoe pads can treat bunions and hammertoe. However, when the foot deformity causes additional orthopaedic issues – such as arthritis and impacted ability to walk – Dr. Elton may recommend surgical intervention.
  • Trigger Finger
    Overview of Condition: Stenosing tenosynovitis or trigger finger is a condition in which the finger becomes locked in a bent position. This is an overuse injury that occurs when the tendons along the top of the hand (flexor tendons) become irritated through repetitive motion and swell. When the flexor tendon is swollen, it is unable to slide through the surrounding tissues that hold the tendon to the bone and move the finger. Symptoms of trigger finger include stiffness, tenderness, pain, a popping sensation, and swelling in the finger. These appear gradually and worsen with time. If left untreated, the flexor tendon can sometimes tear completely. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: When trigger finger is diagnosed early, nonsurgical treatments, such as rest, splinting, and steroid injections, are typically able to resolve this issue. Sometimes at-home exercises are prescribed to help restore full mobility. However, if these conservative treatment methods have no impact, the hand specialists at Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery may recommend surgery to release the tissue preventing the tendon's movement. This is a simple, low-risk surgery that can be performed while the patient is awake, under local anesthesia.
  • Hand Arthritis
    Overview of Condition: The hand is formed by several joints, all of which work together to complete various motions. When the cartilage between those joints starts to break down, the bones in the joint begin to rub against one another, resulting in arthritis. Common symptoms of hand arthritis include swelling, pain, and stiffness as well as a grinding sensation and loss of hand function. Hand arthritis typically forms in the fingers and base of the thumb. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Arthritis is a degenerative disease, meaning there is no cure. However, if diagnosed early, conservative treatments can slow the progression and delay the need for surgical intervention. Ice, bracing, anti-inflammatory medication, physical therapy, and corticosteroid injections can relieve arthritis' painful symptoms. If these treatment methods fail to improve a person's quality of life, Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery hand specialists will discuss surgical options.
  • Finger Fractures and Sprains
    Overview of Condition: Finger injuries are typically the result of a fall, accident, or forceful impact. A finger sprain occurs when the ligaments of the finger are damaged and can sometimes injure the surrounding muscles and cartilage. In severe sprains, the ligament can even tear completely. Fractures of the finger — or a broken finger — can be anything from a tiny hairline fracture to a complex break that fragments the bone. Both injuries can cause pain, reduced mobility, bruising, and swelling. It's important to see an orthopaedic hand and finger specialist for proper diagnosis and treatment. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Finger sprains very rarely require surgery. In the majority of cases, the ligament and surrounding tissue can heal with splinting, taping, or bracing alongside physical therapy. A fractured finger can also be treated with conservative methods. However, if the bones are fragmented or misaligned, our physicians may recommend surgery to restore proper bone alignment.
  • Finger Lacerations and Amputations
    Overview of Condition: Finger lacerations and amputations occur when the finger is cut, crushed, or torn. This causes damage to the finger's skin, tissue, and bone and can sometimes result in a partial or complete removal of the fingertip. When a finger laceration occurs, immediately elevate and immobilize the hand and go to the emergency room. If your finger is completely amputated, cover the wound with gauze, place the amputated finger in a bag, and place the bag on ice. Do not let the amputated finger come in contact with the ice. Immediately report to the emergency room for evaluation. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: At Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery, our hand specialists are on call with emergency rooms in Eagle and Summit County. Additionally, Dr. Dorf and Dr. Joseph have same-day and walk-in appointment slots for urgent care cases. Once your wound has been stabilized, our physicians will recommend a treatment that preserves your finger's length, appearance, and function. If the laceration is minor, treatment could include stitches, protective dressing, or splinting. Surgery may be required to ensure a full recovery for finger amputations or lacerations with significant tissue damage.
  • Skier’s Thumb
    Overview of Condition: Skier's thumb, also known as a torn ulnar collateral ligament (UCL), occurs when the thumb extends beyond its normal range, tearing or stretching the ligament. This is a common injury among skiers who fall with a ski pole in their hand. Symptoms of skier's thumb include pain near the base of the thumb, bruising, swelling, and difficulty holding objects. These painful symptoms will often worsen with time, and if left untreated, a torn UCL can result in long-term pain and instability. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Treatment for skier's thumb will depend on the severity of the issue. When the ligament is merely stretched or partially torn, the team of hand specialists at Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery can often treat the injured UCL nonsurgically. In addition to rest, ice, and anti-inflammatory drugs, our hand physicians will sometimes prescribe a cast to keep the thumb immobilized. When the UCL is completely torn or if the bone in the thumb is fractured, surgery could be necessary for a full recovery.
  • Hip Arthritis
    Overview of Condition: Hip cartilage provides a smooth gliding motion between the bones of the hip joint. Deterioration of the cartilage causes inflammation and pain leading to hip arthritis. Hip arthritis can occur with an acute injury to the joint, general overuse, and wear and tear. Hip arthritis patients often report pain, stiffness, limited range of motion, and impaired standing and walking. These symptoms typically worsen over time. Often seen in an older patient population, hip arthritis is a chronic condition that can impact lifestyle. A diagnosis and treatment with a hip arthritis specialist can help slow the progression of the condition and improve the overall well-being of the patient. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Treatment with a hip specialist provides optimal results for hip arthritis patients. Vail-Summit Orhopaedics & Neurosurgery hip arthritis physicians provide a comprehensive evaluation and treatment plan. Non-surgical treatments involve weight management, physical therapy, exercise, and assistive devices. Anti-inflammation and pain medicine, along with injection therapy, can help reduce debilitation. When nonsurgical methods don’t provide relief, our hip arthritis specialists may recommend surgery. A joint replacement or a hip osteotomy are common surgical procedures our team uses to get patients out of pain and back to an active lifestyle.
  • Hip Impingement
    Overview of Condition: Hip impingement occurs when the femoral head at the tip of the femur (thigh) is in an abnormal orientation to the acetabulum (hip socket). This results in a misalignment of the ball and socket of the hip joint, also known as femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). FAI, or hip impingement, impedes function to the joint, damaging the cartilage and hip labrum. Symptoms often include loss of motion, stiffness, and pain. There are two common types of hip impingement, 1) CAM impingement, which is an abnormality at the femoral head, and 2) pincer infringement, which is an abnormality of the acetabulum. Genetics and an acute injury are often the cause. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery hip physicians specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of hip impingement. Nonsurgical treatments involve rest, pain and inflammation management, movement restriction, injections, and physical therapies. When nonsurgical treatments do not improve symptoms, or in cases of more moderate to severe hip impingement, surgery is recommended. Diagnostic imaging will determine the type of hip impingement – CAM impingement, pincer impingement, or both – and the severity of the injury. Our hip impingement surgeons are highly trained in treating all forms of hip impingement. When indicated, our team utilizes minimally invasive arthroscopic surgery for hip impingement surgery.
  • Chondral Injuries and Lesions
    Overview of Condition: Smooth function of joints relies on healthy chondral cartilage that covers joint surfaces. When the chondral cartilage is damaged, it is diagnosed as chondral injury and/or lesions. These injuries range from mild to severe superficial cracks to full-thickness lesions. Patients often report pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited range of motion in the hip joint. These symptoms can worsen over time and require treatment to avoid degenerative conditions developing. Pain and inflammation management and physical therapy are nonsurgical treatment options. For some patients, surgery may be recommended. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Orthopaedic treatment is important for patients with chondral injury and lesions to avoid complications. The Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery team of chondral injury and lesion specialists provides comprehensive diagnostics and treatment plans. When nonsurgical treatment fails, or for more severe cases, surgery may be required. Surgery options include chondroplasty to repair the damage, microfracture to help promote healing of the cartilage, or autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), a regenerative approach utilizing the patient’s own regrowth cells. Patients who have undergone treatment with our chondral injury and lesion specialists report successful outcomes.
  • Labral Tear of the Hip
    Overview of Condition: A labral tear in the hip occurs in the ring of fibrocartilage (labrum) surrounding the hip joint. Diagnosed as a labral tear of the hip, this injury can be caused by trauma, overuse, or degeneration. Symptoms include pain in the groin and hip, a popping or clicking sensation, and limited motion. VSON's hip specialists provide a comprehensive diagnosis of a hip labrum tear. The location – anterior (front) hip or posterior (back) hip – and the degree of tear, mild to severe, will determine the right treatment plan. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Vail-Summit Orhopaedics & Neurosurgery's team of hip labral tear specialists offers expert diagnostics and treatment of a labral tear to the hip. For mild cases, nonsurgical treatments may be prescribed. These treatments include rest, limited activity, anti-inflammation management, injection therapy, exercise, and physical therapy. When the tear doesn't respond to nonsurgical treatment or with a more severe injury, surgery is recommended. Our hip physicians will determine which surgical technique is best for you. Hip arthroscopy utilizes a tiny internal camera and arthroscopy instruments to perform the repair. In more complex cases, open surgery may be required.
  • Hip Bursitis
    Overview of Condition: Bursae, which are fluid-filled sacs, play an important role in cushioning and lubricating the major joints of the body. An enclosed container of the synovial membrane that produces synovial fluid is the makeup of the bursa. When a hip bursa – the trochanteric bursa, or the iliopsoas bursa – becomes inflamed, it is diagnosed as hip bursitis. Symptoms of hip bursitis include pain and tenderness, stiffness, and decreased joint mobility. Injury, overuse, repetitive motion, incorrect posture, or a genetic condition are often the cause of hip bursitis. Patients experiencing hip bursitis symptoms often seek a medical diagnosis and treatment to find relief. An othopaedic hip specialist is the optimal choice for treating hip bursitis. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Patients trust our hip bursitis specialists at Vail-Summit Orhopaedics & Neurosurgery to treat and relieve pain. Our team provides cutting-edge diagnostic and treatment plans for hip bursitis. In the majority of cases, non-surgical treatment will relieve symptoms. This often involves rest, ice, physical therapy, pain and inflammation management, and injection therapy. If treatment fails, our hip specialists may recommend surgery. When surgery is indicated, our hip surgeons may utilize a bursectomy, which is the removal of the damaged bursa, an iliotibial band release, and/or an abductor repair. Our team of experts has the expertise required for an optimal outcome.
  • Hip Fracture
    Overview of Condition: A hip fracture is a break in the upper femur (thigh bone) near the hip joint. It may involve the femoral head, but more frequently, a hip fracture occurs at the femoral neck. Patients will experience severe pain in the hip that radiates into the groin. Patients also report limitations with weight bearing and movement of the affected leg, along with swelling and bruising. Orthopaedic care for a hip fracture is critical to support recovery and avoid debilitating long-term complications, including loss of mobility and increased fall risk. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: It is recommended that patients seek medical attention due to an acute hip fracture. Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery's hip fracture specialists are highly trained in diagnosing and treating hip fractures. The type of fracture and damage to surrounding tissue will determine the right treatment course. Non-surgical bracing to immobilize the joint may be prescribed for a mild injury. Surgery is indicated when the hip fracture is displaced, has multiple breaks, or has damaged the adjacent joint surface. Our hip fracture surgeons use open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF), along with hemiarthroplasty surgical procedures for hip fractures. Healing, rehabilitation, and recovery can be lengthy, depending on the surgery type, the patient's age, and overall health. Orthopaedic care from our hip fracture physicians is a smart choice for optimal results.
  • Knee Instability
    Overview of Condition: Knee instability is the sensation that your knee is locking or catching, an inability to bear weight, and a chronic "giving out" of the joint. Frequent knee instability will be accompanied by other painful symptoms, such as swelling, popping, grinding, and pain while at rest. It's worth noting that knee instability is not a condition but a symptom of an underlying orthopaedic issue. An untreated ligament injury, torn meniscus, patellar tendon injury, arthritis, and femoral nerve damage are just a few orthopaedic issues that cause knee instability. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: If your knee is constantly collapsing or feels unstable, the worst thing a patient can do is try to "wait it out" or "push through the pain." Knee instability is often a symptom of a serious injury or condition, and failure to seek treatment from an orthopaedic knee specialist can damage the surrounding tissue or lead to irreversible trauma to the joint. At Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery, our team of expert knee physicians will take the time to understand the nature of your symptoms, your medical history, and your lifestyle to accurately diagnose the issue behind your knee instability and design a treatment plan that gets you back to the activities you love.
  • Articular Cartilage Surgery
    Overview of Condition: Articular cartilage is the smooth, slippery surface at the ends of bones. It prevents the bones from grinding against each and allows for the full range of motion in the joint. A lifetime of active living or a traumatic injury can cause the articular cartilage to wear down or become damaged. When this occurs, the bones in the joint begin to rub against one another, resulting in arthritis. Patients with knee arthritis caused by articular cartilage damage experience pain, swelling, stiffness, and catching in the joint. These symptoms will typically start gradually and worsen over time. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Articular cartilage restoration surgery is typically performed on younger patients who have lost sections of their articular cartilage due to orthopaedic trauma. The surgical procedure performed will depend on the location of the cartilage damage and if there are other problems in the joint — such as a torn meniscus. The knee physicians at Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery may attempt nonsurgical treatment methods, including stem cell injections, before recommending surgery.
  • Meniscus Tears
    Overview of Condition: The meniscus is a c-shaped piece of cartilage that sits between the femur and the tibia. It cushions the bones and allows the knee to rotate smoothly. When the knee experiences a sharp twisting or cutting motion, the meniscus can tear, causing the following symptoms: Pain, swelling, and stiffness A popping or locking sensation Knee instability and impacted range of motion There are several different types of meniscus tears, categorized by the injury's location. It is possible to tear the meniscus and the ACL simultaneously. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Different areas of the meniscus have different amounts of blood supply. If the meniscus is torn in an area with high blood flow, the tear could potentially heal without surgical intervention. In those patients, the orthopaedic knee experts at VSON may recommend a combination of bracing, medication, injections, and physical therapy. If the meniscus tear occurs in a section with limited blood flow, knee function is affected, or there are multiple tears in the meniscus, surgery is almost always needed to restore proper movement and stability.
  • Knee Ligament Injuries
    Overview of Condition: Ligaments are flexible bands of tissue that provide stability and strength and connect the bones in the joint. The knee joint is composed of four major ligaments: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL): The center knee ligament; controls forward movement and knee rotation. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL): The ligament in the back of the knee; controls backward movement. Medial collateral ligament (MCL): The inner knee joint ligament; stabilizes the inner knee. Lateral collateral ligament (LCL): The outer knee joint ligament; stabilizes the outside of the knee. An injury to any of these ligaments could result in knee instability, pain, swelling, and an inability to bear weight. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: The ACL is the most commonly injured knee ligament. It can be stretched or torn due to a sudden twisting motion, fall, or direct impact. The PCL is frequently injured in a direct impact, while a sudden blow to the side of the knee will damage the MCL and LCL. Imaging tests are required to diagnose a knee ligament injury; treatment will depend on whether the ligament is torn or stretched. While some ligament injuries can be treated conservatively, a torn ACL will always require surgery.
  • Patellar Tendon Injuries & Conditions
    Overview of Condition: The patellar tendon attaches the kneecap to the tibia. It, along with the quadriceps tendon and muscles, is responsible for helping the knee straighten as the joint goes through its full range of motion. Like any other tendon in the body, the tissue can become inflamed from overuse or tear due to a forceful impact, direct fall, or bad landing. Inflammation of the patellar tendon is known as patellar tendonitis and causes pain, swelling, and tenderness around the kneecap. A patellar tendon tear can be partial or complete, resulting in pain, swelling, bruising, and deformity in the kneecap and instability in the knee. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: The team of knee specialists at Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery will quickly and accurately diagnose your patellar tendon injury through a combination of physical exams and imaging tests. Tendonitis can typically be treated nonsurgically with icing, bracing, medication, and physical therapy. If the patellar tendon is torn, surgery may be needed to restore proper knee function — especially if the tear is complete. Patellar tendon repair surgery will either reattach the two ends of the torn tendon or reattach the tendon to the kneecap. Recovery from this procedure can take 6-12 months.
  • Cervical Pain
    Overview of Condition: Neck pain, medically referred to as cervical pain, is a common complaint of patients seeking orthopaedic care. Patients with neck pain report a wide range of symptoms, including stiffness, tenderness, pain, limited neck and head range of motion, and sleep disruption. Causes of neck pain can vary in nature. Our neck specialists see neck pain due to: a chronic condition, an acute injury to the cervical spine, improper posture habits, muscle strain, nerve compression, herniated disc, and osteoarthritis. In certain cases, cervical pain may respond to conservative treatment methods. An examination by a cervical spine specialist will determine the cause of cervical pain and the optimal treatment plan. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Pain relief motivates patients to seek care. Vail-Summit Orthopedics & Neurosurgery's cervical pain specialists provide patients with an accurate diagnosis and care plan to help relieve pain. Non-surgical treatment options include physical therapy to improve strength and mobility, ice and heat therapy to help reduce inflammation and relax muscle spasms, pain management, anti-inflammation medicines, injection therapies, acupuncture, and therapeutic massage. When conservative treatments fail, or in cases of severe neck pain, surgery may be indicated. Our cervical pain specialists can determine the correct surgical procedure, which often includes anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), arthroplasty, or artificial disc surgery. Patients receive state-of-the-art care with our cervical pain specialists.
  • Traumatic Neck Injuries
    Overview of Condition: A blunt force impact to the cervical spine can result in a traumatic neck injury. Contact sports, car accidents, and falls are common causes. Traumatic neck injury symptoms can range from mild to severe. Patients who have an acute neck injury often complain of decreased mobility of the neck and head, stiffness, pain, tenderness, swelling, and bruising. Underlying injuries such as a spinal cord injury, nerve damage, and paralysis may be present. Treatment by a neck injury specialist is highly recommended for patients diagnosed with a traumatic neck injury to help eliminate any risk of complication. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Patients trust Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery traumatic neck injury doctors for a detailed diagnosis and treatment course. Our neck doctors treat cases that range from minor to severe. From strains and sprains to severe dislocations, fractures, and spinal cord damage, our team has the expertise. In mild cases, patients can benefit from rest, ice therapy, pain, anti-inflammatory medication, and immobilizing the neck. For more complex injuries, surgery may be required. A cervical laminectomy and fusion treat injured nerves, and a cervical disc replacement treats disc damage. Our team relies on minimally invasive techniques to promote quick recovery.
  • Pinched Cervical Nerve
    Overview of Condition: A pinched cervical nerve occurs when the nerve root becomes irritated and compressed, causing pain, tingling, numbness, and weakness in the neck, arm, hand, and fingers. A high incidence of pinched cervical nerve affects the C-7 (closer to the base of your neck) but can happen to any cervical disk. Herniated disks, arthritis, narrowing of the spinal canal (spinal stenosis), and an acute neck injury can contribute to this condition. For mild pinched cervical nerves, non-surgical treatments often provide relief. For more severe cases, surgery may be required. A thorough evaluation from a pinched cervical nerve specialist is recommended to prevent worsening symptoms. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery pinched cervical nerve specialists provide a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan for patients. Conservative options involve avoiding activities causing neck strain, improved posture, pain management, physical therapy, heat/cold alternating compresses, and injection therapies. When symptoms persist, or in severe cases, surgery may be required. Our specialists are trusted by patients for pinched cervical neck surgery. Minimally invasive cervical discectomy, cervical laminectomy, and cervical fusion are often utilized.
  • Cervical Disk Degeneration
    Overview of Condition: Cervical disk degeneration is a normal process of aging. It happens to most people but can be compounded by injury, disease, and activity level. A sedentary lifestyle and repetitive stressors to the neck are common contributors to this condition. Patients will notice a loss of height and flexibility in the neck and spine. Symptoms involve neck pain, stiffness, limited range of motion, radiating pain, weakness, and numbness in the arm and hand. Over time, degeneration worsens, increasing pressure on adjacent nerves and causing an increase in symptoms. Patients are recommended to seek medical treatment to relieve pain and improve neck function. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Cervical disk degeneration treatments are dependent upon the severity of the condition. Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery cervical disk degeneration specialists recommend being seen as soon as symptoms are noticed to avoid long-term complications. The first treatment step is typically conservative treatment. These include pain medications, physical therapy, heat/ice alternating therapy, and injection therapies. For more severe cases – based on the location and size of the herniation – and when non-surgical treatments fail, surgery is indicated. Our team often utilizes minimally invasive cervical discectomy and cervical fusion procedures to treat cervical disk degeneration.
  • Herniated Cervical Disk
    Overview of Condition: Common in older patients, herniated cervical disk condition is caused by age, genetics, and sudden forceful movement or strain to the neck. A cervical disk becomes herniated when the gel-like center of the disk bulges or ruptures out of its interior position. The protrusion can press onto adjacent nerves, generating pain in the neck that can radiate down into the limbs and cause weakness and tingling. Symptoms range from mild to severe. In certain cases, symptoms can impact daily activities and interrupt sleep. Patients benefit from a medical evaluation to develop an optimum treatment plan. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery herniated cervical disk specialists provide a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan. The cause and severity of the injury will determine the treatment plan. Mild cases can benefit from nonsurgical treatments. Nonsurgical treatments, including pain management medications, and heat/ice therapy, can relieve pain, practicing good posture, physical therapy for strength and flexibility, and avoiding neck-straining activities. Neck support during sleep is also recommended. When symptoms persist, or in severe cases, our neck specialists may recommend surgery. Using minimally invasive techniques, such as cervical discectomy or cervical fusion, are often effective.
  • Shoulder Impingement
    Overview of Condition: Shoulder impingement – also known as swimmer's shoulder – is an overuse injury. It develops when the tendons in the rotator cuff, which help your arm to rotate and raise, become inflamed through repetitive motion and start to pinch or rub against the top outer edge of the shoulder blade. Symptoms of shoulder impingement begin gradually, worsening over time. The main symptom of shoulder impingement is pain in the front of the shoulder when extending, lifting, and lowering your arm, lying on your arm, and when reaching behind your back. Other symptoms include shoulder weakness and tenderness. Shoulder tendonitis and bursitis often occur alongside shoulder impingement. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Shoulder impingement is the most common shoulder condition, estimated to be the cause of 45-65% of all reported shoulder pain. Most cases of shoulder impingement can be treated conservatively using rest, ice, activity modification, oral medications, physical therapy, and steroid injections. If nonsurgical methods have no effect after two months, the shoulder doctors at Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery may recommend shoulder impingement surgery to remove the inflamed tissue.
  • Shoulder Arthritis
    Overview of Condition: The most common form of shoulder arthritis is osteoarthritis. Since the shoulder joint is not weight-bearing, shoulder osteoarthritis is less common than osteoarthritis of the hip and knee. However, prior trauma to the shoulder or a lifetime of heavy lifting or repetitive overhead work can wear away at the cartilage between the ball and socket, causing the bones in the shoulder joint to grind against one another. When this occurs, patients often complain of pain, stiffness, inflammation, and limited range of motion in the shoulder. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Arthritis is a degenerative condition, meaning there is no cure. However, the painful symptoms of shoulder arthritis can be managed with nonsurgical treatments that can also slow the disease's progression. At Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery, our shoulder specialists may prescribe rest, ice, anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, and steroid injections. If these methods fail to deliver results, our physicians will discuss the surgical options for shoulder arthritis. If the shoulder arthritis is severe, a shoulder replacement may be recommended to relieve pain and restore function.
  • Shoulder Dislocation & Stabilization Surgery
    Overview of Condition: Unless there is damage to the surrounding bone and tissue, shoulder dislocations very rarely require surgery to fix. However, the younger the patient is at the time of their first dislocation, the more likely they are to have another dislocation later in life. If the first dislocation occurs when the patient is 20 or younger, they have a 70-100% chance of a second, or even third, dislocation. This can result in shoulder instability, where the ball of the shoulder repeatedly slips out of the socket. Symptoms of shoulder instability include chronic pain, a sensation of looseness in the joint, and an increased risk of shoulder sprains or dislocations. To prioritize a patient's safety, arm function, and quality of life, the shoulder doctors at Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery will often recommend surgical intervention. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: At Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery, our team of shoulder experts recommends shoulder stabilization surgery to repair instability and restore function. This is especially true for athletes for whom shoulder instability is life-threatening, including rock climbers, kayakers, and big mountain skiers. The shoulder stabilization procedure our doctors will recommend depends on the amount of damage to the shoulder labrum, ligaments, and cartilage as well as the patient's outcome goals.
  • Rotator Cuff Injuries
    Overview of Condition: The shoulder is made up of the humerus (upper arm bone), scapula (shoulder blade), and the collarbone (clavicle). All these bones are kept in place by the tendons and muscles that make up the rotator cuff. Not only does the rotator cuff keep the shoulder joint in place, but it helps the joint move through rotations and perform lifting motions. When the rotator cuff is torn or damaged, motions of the shoulder can become painful. Other symptoms of a rotator cuff injury include shoulder weakness, a cracking sensation in the joint, and impacted range of motion. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: A common rotator cuff injury is a tear, which can be caused by repetitive stress, degeneration, or an injury. Rotator cuff tears are categorized as partial or complete and typically occur in patients over 40 years old, athletes who perform repetitive motions, and professionals who routinely lift or hold items overhead. Eighty percent of rotator cuff tears can be treated nonsurgically with rest, anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, and steroid injections. However, if the rotator cuff is separated from the shoulder bone or the patient wishes to return to a high level of athletic performance, our team of shoulder specialists may recommend surgery.
  • Clavicle Fractures
    Overview of Condition: The collarbone, or clavicle, is the long, thin bone that runs from the sternum to the shoulder and connects the arm to the body. A clavicle fracture can occur due to forceful impact to the shoulder, collision, or by attempting to break a fall. Broken collarbones are typically immediately obvious. Its symptoms include pain, a lump or bump in the collarbone, swelling, bruising, tenderness, and a grinding sensation in the shoulder. Clavicle fractures should be treated by an orthopaedic shoulder specialist immediately to ensure the bone heals correctly. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: A broken collarbone is separated into two types: aligned and misaligned. An aligned fracture means there is one clean break in the bone, while a misaligned clavicle fracture means the bone is broken in several places and displaced. Aligned clavicle fractures can typically be treated nonsurgically with a sling, icing, anti-inflammatory medications, and physical therapy. If the clavicle fracture is misaligned, surgery is usually needed to fix the bone in place with screws to stabilize the bone and ensure it heals properly. When it comes to healing a broken collarbone, quick treatment and proper diagnosis are essential to restoring complete function.
  • Bicep Tendon Injuries
    Overview of Condition: The bicep is composed of two muscles: the short head and the long head. Two tendons attach these muscles to the elbow and shoulder. Overuse or an injury can cause these tendons to inflame (bicep tendonitis) or tear (bicep tendon tear), resulting in pain, swelling, weakness, and an inability to perform everyday arm movements. Additionally, a bicep tendon tear can lead to a "popeye" bulge when the muscle separates from the bone and falls down the arm. To diagnose a biceps tendon injury, the shoulder experts at Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery will conduct a physical exam and imaging tests. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Both biceps tendonitis and a biceps tendon tear can be treated nonsurgically. Biceps tendonitis will often respond to rest, ice, compression, steroid and anti-inflammatory medication, bracing, or injections. Only in very rare situations does the inflamed biceps tendon need to be surgically removed. A torn biceps tendon can be treated with similar conservative methods, but to completely restore arm strength and remove any deformities, surgical intervention is needed. The longer a torn bicep goes without proper treatment, the more difficult the surgery is to perform.
  • Back Pain
    Overview of Condition: 80% of people experience back pain at some point in their life. Symptoms include back aching, sharp pain, muscle spasms, stiffness, and decreased mobility. A wide range of causes can contribute to back pain. From simple overuse injuries like muscle strains and ligament sprains to more complex disc herniations, degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, acute injury, and disease can cause back pain. Back pain symptoms can range from mild to severe, acute for a short term, or chronic and lingering over time. It is important for patients to seek medical care to find relief from back pain. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery's back pain specialists begin treatment with a thorough evaluation of the underlying causes to locate the pain source for an accurate diagnosis and targeted treatment plan. Our specialists prescribe non-surgical treatments whenever possible. This includes pain and anti-inflammatory medications, injection therapies, physical therapy, heat and ice therapy, and the use of muscle relaxants when needed. Surgery is only recommended after other measures fail. Our doctors work closely with each patient to determine the optimal procedure. This often involves minimally invasive discectomy, laminectomy, spinal decompression, or spinal fusion.
  • Radiculopathy
    Overview of Condition: When patients complain of back pain, it may be a symptom of radiculopathy. Patients with radiculopathy often report weakness, tingling, and numbness in the arms and legs, which are symptoms that often indicate compression of a nerve root caused by radiculopathy. This condition is commonly associated with aging. As the body starts to age, the discs in the spine start to degenerate and bulge. Discs in the spine can also begin to dry and harden. The body’s response to these degenerative changes involves the creation of bone spurs to strengthen the discs. Unfortunately, these bone spurs can narrow the nerve root, exit, and pinch the nerve. This condition can range from mild to severe. It is essential that patients seek medical care for pain relief. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Understanding the underlying cause of radiculopathy is the first step toward treatment. Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery radiculopathy specialists have the expertise to determine all the factors, provide a diagnosis, and recommend a treatment plan for recovery and prevention of more significant nerve injury. Mild cases use non-surgical measures. Flexibility and strength increase with physical therapy. Inflammation and pain medications and heat/ice therapy help with daily management. Injection therapies can improve function. Our spine specialists may recommend surgery when the condition persists or in severe cases. Minimally invasive procedures often involve spinal decompression, spinal fusion, or laminectomy. Our doctors work closely with patients to determine a treatment plan that helps them meet their outcome goals.
  • Spondylolisthesis
    Overview of Condition: When a vertebrae of the spine slips out of position, it will impact the lower vertebrae. This is diagnosed as spondylolisthesis, a condition causing nerve compression, decreased range of motion, and back pain. Typical causes of spondylolisthesis vary from injury to degeneration of the spine and genetic abnormalities. While symptoms can be treated with a range of nonsurgical options, this condition can worsen over time, causing more pain and decreased mobility. It is recommended that patients seek medical treatment to help relieve pain and improve their overall quality of life. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery spondylolisthesis specialists provide a complete evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment plan for patients suffering from spondylolisthesis. Mild cases employ nonsurgical treatments, such as physical therapy for strengthening and mobility, pain and anti-inflammation medications, a back brace for stability, and injection therapies. Surgery may be recommended when symptoms don't improve or with severe nerve compression. Our specialists often utilize minimally invasive spinal fusion, which involves joining two or more vertebrae, or laminectomy, which involves removing the area of bone impacting the nerve. Our specialists are highly experienced in spinal surgery and provide comprehensive recovery for patients suffering from spondylolisthesis.
  • Degenerative Disc Disease
    Overview of Condition: When spinal discs begin to deteriorate, it is diagnosed as degenerative disc disease (DDD). Degeneration in the spine is normal with age, most commonly seen in the lower back (lumbar spine) and neck (cervical spine). In minor cases of DDD, patients don’t always notice any symptoms. Over time, deterioration increases and symptoms begin. Patients often report loss of mobility, stiffness, muscle spasms, numbness, back pain, and radiating pain to the arms and legs. It is essential for patients to seek a full spinal evaluation to manage the condition and prevent worsening symptoms over time. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: An accurate diagnosis and treatment plan are essential to degenerative disc disease management. Our spine specialists at Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery provide expert care for degenerative disc disease patients. Common treatments include physical therapy for pain relief and strengthening, anti-inflammatory and pain medications, heat/ice alternate therapy, and injection treatments. When conservative treatments fail, surgery may be required. Our spine surgeons often utilize minimally invasive spinal fusion (joining two or more vertebrae together) or an artificial disc replacement (removing the degenerated disc and installing an artificial disc in its place). Patients benefit from our team’s expertise, knowledge, compassion, and dedication to getting them back to the activities they love.
  • Spinal Stenosis
    Overview of Condition: Patients experiencing numbness, tingling, and weakness in the neck, back, and limbs may have a condition known as spinal stenosis. When the open space within the spinal column – the spinal canal – narrows, it can cause compression of the spinal cord and its nerve structures. The causes of spinal stenosis include normal wear and tear, aging, arthritis, disc herniation, tumors, and spine anomalies. Symptoms may also involve decreased function and pain. It is recommended that patients seek medical treatment for a thorough spine evaluation to help manage spinal stenosis. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery's spinal stenosis specialists provide a comprehensive evaluation and treatment plan. Our spine specialists will recommend a treatment plan that addresses the underlying cause and severity of the condition. For mild cases, VSON physicians will begin treatment with conservative measures. For strengthening, physical therapy will help. Medications will be recommended for managing pain and inflammation. Injection therapies can also reduce pain. Surgery may be needed when the condition does not improve or in severe cases. Our physicians work with each patient to determine the optimal procedure and often utilize minimally invasive procedures such as laminectomy, spinal fusion, and spinal decompression.
  • Disc Herniation
    Overview of Condition: When the gel-like center (nucleus pulposus) of a spinal disk bulges or ruptures out of its normal position, it is diagnosed as a herniated, slipped, or ruptured disk. A herniated disk can occur at any section of the spine, cervical (neck), thoracic (upper back), but is most frequently seen in the lumbar (lower) spine. Many factors can contribute to this injury, including normal wear and tear, aging, acute injury, repetitive motion, and improper lifting. The nature of this condition places pressure on the adjacent nerves of the spinal cord, causing pain, numbness, weakness, and tingling in the neck, back, arms, and legs. It is recommended that patients seek medical care to relieve pain. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Treatment depends on the severity and location of the disc herniation and the associated symptoms. Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery's disc herniation specialists provide an exhaustive diagnosis and treatment plan for patients suffering a disc herniation. Whenever indicated, non-surgical treatments are prescribed, including pain and anti-inflammation medications, physical therapy for strengthening, heat/cold alternating therapy, and therapeutic injections. When symptoms persist, or in case of severe disc herniation, surgery may be indicated. Our expert team often utilizes minimally invasive lumbar discectomy, lumbar laminectomy, and lumbar spinal fusion to treat this condition.
  • Partial Knee Replacement
    Overview of Procedure: A partial knee replacement involves replacing only the damaged portion of the knee joint with an artificial implant. This procedure may be recommended for patients with arthritis or damage in only one compartment of the knee. Compared to total knee replacement, which involves replacing the entire knee joint, a partial knee replacement is a less invasive procedure with a shorter recovery time.
  • Knee Replacement Revision Surgery
    Overview of Procedure: A total joint replacement is one of the most successful orthopaedic procedures performed, with the implant having an average lifespan of 15-20 years. Normally, patients who undergo a total knee replacement are in their 70s, meaning the implant will typically last for the remainder of their lifetime. If a younger, more active patient needed a total knee replacement, however, they may need a second operation to replace the implant later in life. This is what's known as a knee replacement revision surgery. During knee revision surgery, the original knee implant is removed, and a new prosthesis is inserted. Knee replacement revision surgery is more complex than the original surgery, requiring more preoperative planning and surgical skill.
  • Total Knee Replacement
    Overview of Procedure: The knee is composed of three bones: the femur (thighbone), the upper part of the tibia (shinbone), and the patella (kneecap), all of which are protected by cartilage that allows for smooth movement of the knee. If the joint becomes damaged over time due to arthritis or injury, it can cause pain, stiffness, and instability, and make it difficult to perform daily activities. These symptoms can often be relieved through a total knee replacement, in which the worn-out joint is replaced with an artificial one. During a total knee replacement, the surgeon will make an incision along the knee to access the joint. Damaged cartilage and bone are removed, and the joint surfaces are reshaped to fit the implant precisely. The surgeon will then ensure proper function and a full range of motion by bending and rotating the knee. A total knee replacement is usually performed as an outpatient procedure, meaning patients can return home that day. Following surgery, regaining strength and mobility through physical therapy is a crucial part of recovery, which can take between three and 12 months.
  • Total Hip Replacement
    Overview of Procedure: The hip joint is a ball-and-socket joint, where the ball (the femoral head) sits in the socket (the acetabulum). In a healthy hip, the ball and socket move smoothly against each other, allowing for a wide range of motion. However, over time, the joint may become damaged due to conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or a hip fracture. A total hip replacement can alleviate these symptoms by replacing the damaged joint with a new, artificial one. The procedure involves making an incision along the hip joint, removing the ball of your hip and any damaged bone and cartilage, then implanting the prosthetic ball and socket, which are designed to move smoothly and mimic a healthy hip joint. Total hip replacements are usually performed on an outpatient basis, meaning you can go home that day. Recovery time will vary, but most people can resume normal activities and return to sports within three months.
  • Hip Replacement Revision Surgery
    Overview of Procedure: Although a total hip replacement is one of the most successful orthopaedic procedures, there are instances when the implant wears out, fails, or needs to be replaced. Hip replacement revision surgery is when all or some of the original hip implant is removed and replaced. This procedure is primarily recommended due to the implant loosening or wearing down - typically seen in active patients who were younger at the time of their initial replacement. However, if the patient fractured their artificial hip, if the hip is dislocated, or if there is a surgical complication, such as an infection, hip replacement revision surgery could be the best solution. Hip revision surgery is a complex procedure that requires extensive skill and planning. Finding an orthopaedic joint replacement physician with a strong track record in revision surgeries is essential.
  • Partial Hip Replacement
    Overview of Procedure: A partial hip replacement involves only replacing the ball of the hip joint with an artificial implant and not the socket. This is usually performed on patients who have suffered a fracture of the femoral head from trauma. During the surgery, the damaged bone tissue and cartilage are removed, and the ball is replaced with an implant. A partial hip replacement is less invasive than total hip replacement, and patients typically experience less pain and a shorter recovery time. However, the procedure is not suitable for everyone, and a total hip replacement may be necessary for those with more severe hip damage or arthritis.
  • Overuse Wrist Injuries
    Overview of Condition: There are three common overuse injuries we treat at Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery: Carpal tunnel syndrome De Quervain's tenosynovitis Inflammatory wrist pain All these injuries are seen in patients whose professions, hobbies, or sports include repetitive wrist motions. This is because the repetitive movements of the wrist place stress on the nerves, blood vessels, and tendons. Prolonged stress can damage the components of the wrist, leading to numbness, tingling, and weakness in the hand as well as debilitating wrist pain. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: After the team of expert hand physicians at Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery diagnose your overuse injury, Dr. Dorf or Dr. Joseph will recommend a treatment plan that's right for you. In the majority of patients, overuse wrist injuries can be treated nonsurgically with splinting or bracing, anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, and steroid injections. However, if nonsurgical treatments have no impact, our wrist specialists may recommend surgery to resolve the underlying issue.
  • Wrist Fractures and Sprains
    Overview of Condition: Wrist sprains and fractures are common traumatic injuries in our active mountain community. Frequently caused by breaking a fall with an outstretched hand or a direct blow, wrist sprains and fractures can have similar symptoms, including pain, swelling, bruising, tenderness, and weakness in the wrist. A wrist fracture is often accompanied by a popping sensation and obvious deformity. An examination by a wrist specialist is essential to diagnose the nature of the injury and its severity. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Wrist sprains and fractures should receive immediate treatment. Until you can speak with an orthopaedic wrist doctor, stabilize, elevate, and ice your wrist to reduce pain and ease swelling. A wrist sprain can be treated conservatively with a compression bandage and anti-inflammatory medication. Wrist fractures do not always need surgery. If none of the bones have fragmented, a broken wrist can often be treated with a splint or cast. However, if the bones have fragmented or are misaligned, the wrist physicians at Vail-Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery may recommend surgery.
  • Wrist Arthritis and Tendonitis
    Overview of Condition: Wrist arthritis and tendonitis are chronic wrist conditions that develop over time. Arthritis occurs when the cartilage between the bones in the wrist joint starts to wear away, leading to bone grinding against bone. Wrist arthritis can cause consistent and severe pain and stiffness in the joint. Tendonitis forms when the tendons in the wrist become inflamed, causing pain, swelling, and the formation of nodules as well as a crackling sensation in the wrist. If left untreated, the tendon could tear or completely rupture. Recommended Treatment if Applicable: Wrist arthritis is a degenerative condition, meaning there is no cure. However, the disease's progression can be slowed and its painful symptoms relieved with nonsurgical treatment, such as splinting, physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medication, and steroid injections. Surgical treatment for wrist arthritis is available if the condition has progressed to the point where conservative treatment methods provide no relief. In most wrist tendonitis patients, splinting or bracing, steroid injections, and physical therapy can resolve the inflammation. However, sometimes surgery is needed to remove the inflamed tissue.
  • Evaluation:
    A orthopaedics-trained healthcare professional will evaluate you. If needed, a VSON orthopaedic physician will be contacted to provide a consultation. Our Urgent Care facility has on-site x-rays, MRIs, and ultrasounds.
  • Visit:
    Our urgent care is open every weekday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. and weekends 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. You can walk in at any time and receive treatment for an orthopaedic injury.
  • Follow Up:
    After your urgent care visit, we will schedule a follow-up appointment with the appropriate orthopaedic subspecialist. Depending upon the severity of the injury, some patients will meet their surgeon the day they walk in for a diagnosis.
  • Treatment:
    Once the injury is diagnosed, patients will receive immediate treatment. All suturing, joint reductions, casting, and wound care is provided on-site.
  • Hospital Affiliations
    Gunnison Valley Hospital · Gunnison, Colorado Active Staff Gunnison Valley Hospital · Gunnison, Colorado Chief of Medical Staff, 2014-2016 Alpine Surgery Center, LLC · Gunnison, Colorado Active Staff, President, Medical Director
  • Professional Affiliations
    See the "Women Who Rock" section in MTNtown magazine for an interview with Dr. Beim Dr. Beim featured on The Today Show The Female Athletes Body Book; How to prevent and treat sports injuries in women and girls Gloria Beim, M.D. and Ruth Winter, M.S. Published by McGraw Hill books, April, 2003 www.femaleathletesbodybook.com Acromioclavicular Joint Injuries Beim, GM. Chapter in Journal of Athletic Training, Volume 35, Number 3, July-September, 2000 Recognition and Treatment of Refractory Posterior Capsular Contracture of the Shoulder Beim GM, Ticker, Jonathan B, Warner, Jon J.P., Chapter in Arthroscopy, The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery, pp. 27-34, February, 2000 Sports Injuries in Women Beim GM. Women’s Health, Orthopaedic Edition, February, 1999 Posterior Instability of the Shoulder Beim, GM, Warner JJP. Chapter in Clinical Orthopaedics. Ed. Craig, 1999, pp. 192-202. Combined Bankart and HAGL Lesion Associated with Anterior Shoulder Instability Beim GM, Warner JJP. The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery, December, 1997 Injuries to the Acromioclavicular Joint in the Throwing Athlete Beim GM, Warner JJP. Chapter in Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine, Spring - 1997 EMG Study of Abdominal Exercises Beim GM, Giraldo J, Pincinero D, Fu FH. Journal of Sports Rehab, February, 1997 Classification and Treatment of DJD of the Knee Beim GM, Fu FH. Orthopaedic Special Edition, Vol. 2(1):31-34, February, 1996 Recognition and Treatment of Refractory Posterior Capsular Contracture of the Shoulder Beim GM, Ticker J, Warner JJP. Orthopaedic Transaction, Fall 1996 Issues of the Female Athlete Beim GM, Stone D. The Orthopaedic Clinics of North America 26(3), 443-451, July, 1995 Current Concepts of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Beim GM, Fu F. Indian Arthroscopy Association, July, 1995 The Treatment of Childhood and Adolescent Femur Fractures with External Fixation Higgs GB, Jelsma RD, Beim GM, Roye DP. Orthopaedic Transactions, Fall - 1994 Classics in Conventional Radiography of the Foot Macauly, Beim GM, Sartoris D. Journal of Foot Surgery, 31(5):519-26, Sept-October, 1992 Intramedullary Plugs in Cemented Hip Arthroplasty Beim GM, Lavernia C, Convery FR. Orthopaedic Transactions, Fall 1989; Journal Indian Arthroscopy of Arthroplasty, Vol. 4, Number 2:139, June, 1989
  • Team Affiliations
    Chief Medical Officer, Team USA: 2014 Olympic Games - Sochi, Russia Head Team Physician for Team USA: 2020 Summer Paralympic Games, Tokyo Chief Medical Officer, Team USA: 2018 Winter Paralympic Games – PyeongChang, South Korea Head Team Physician: NCAA Western State Colorado University Sports Program (2017 - Present) Chief Medical Officer, Team, USA: 2016 Summer Paralympic Games - Rio, Brazil Team Physician, Freestyle Ski Team, USA: Winter X Games – Aspen, CO (Jan 2019) Team Physician, USA Cycling and Taekwondo: 2004 Olympic Games - Athens, Greece Official Medical Provider: 2014 U.S. Ski Team, U.S. Snowboarding and U.S. Freeski Chief Medical Officer, Team USA: 2014 Olympic Games - Sochi, Russia Venue Medical Director, USA High Performance Center: 2012 Olympic Games - London, England Chief Medical Officer, Team USA: 2012 BMX World Championships - Birmingham, England Event Physician and Orthopaedic Surgeon: National Wrestling Nationals - Orlando, Florida Event Physician and Orthopaedic Surgeon: Winter X Games - Crested Butte, CO - 1998 and 1999 Team Physician - Football, Wrestling, Track, Basketball, Volleyball and Skiing: Western State Colorado University - Gunnison, CO (1996-present) Physician and Orthopaedic Surgeon: Olympic Trials for Wrestling - Pittsburgh, PA - 1996 Assistant Team Physician to Dr. Freddie Fu: University of Pittsburgh Football and Wrestling Teams - 1995-1996 Assistant Physician to Dr. Freddie Fu: Pittsburgh Ballet - 1995-1996
  • Education
    Doctor of Medicine, University of California at San Diego Orthopaedic Residency, New York Orthopaedic Hospital at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center Fellowship, University of Pittsburgh Center for Sports Medicine
  • Honors and Awards
    National Defense Service Medal with 1 Service Star AF Training Ribbon AF Outstanding Unit Award with 3 Oak Leaf Clusters Global War on Terrorism Service Medal United States Air Force Commendation Medal Korean Defense Service Medal Nuclear Deterrence Operations Service Medal Canfield-Roseman Entrepreneur of the year award Afghanistan Campaign Medal with 2 Service Stars Air Force Expeditionary Service Ribbon with Gold Border NATO Medal AF Organizational Excellence Award AF Longevity Service with 3 Oak Leaf Clusters
  • Presentations
    Head Injury. Presented at Defense Medical Readiness Training Institute: Emergency War Surgery Course; San Antonio Texas, 8 December 2009. Complex Thoracolumbar Spinal Reconstruction. Presented at Spine Science and Art Study Group: Winter Session, Park City, Utah, 9 March 2013 Penetrating Head Injuries and Reconstruction. Presented at Third Annual Heart of Texas Trauma Topics, Trauma Symposium, Waco, Texas 30 July 2013 Neurosurgical Support of the Global War on Terror, Texas Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting, San Antonio Texas, 1 March 2014 Starting Complex Spine Program in an ASC, Becker’s 16th Annual Future of Spine Conference, 14 June 2018
  • Certifications
    Board Certification: Passed, American Board of Neurologic Surgery Boards (ABNS)
  • Education
    BS, United States Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colorado MD, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Internship, Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland AFB, Texas Residency in Neurosurgery, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania MBA, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Chief Resident in Neurosurgery, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
  • Professional Societies
    American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS)Resident, 2002-2009 Active Military Provisional, 2010 Fellow AANS 2016 AANS/CNS Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves 2002- Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) Abstract Reviewer CNS Section of Neurotrauma and Critical Care 2018 2012 North American Spine Society (NASS)
  • Hospital Affiliations
    Vail Valley Medical Center Vail Valley Surgery Center
  • Peer-Reviewed Articles and Publications
    Braxton, E., Jr., Wohlfeld, B. J., Blumenthal, S., Bozzio, A., Buttermann, G., Guyer, R., Idema, J., Laich, D., Morreale, J., Nikolakis, M., Patel, A., Price, J. S., Witt, J. P., Zigler, J., & Martin, M. (2019). Postoperative Care Pathways Following Lumbar Total Disc Replacement: Results of a Modified Delphi Approach. Spine (Phila Pa 1976), 44 Suppl 24, S1-s12. https://doi.org/10.1097/brs.0000000000003276 Braxton EE Jr, Ehrlich GD, Hall-Stoodley L, Stoodley P, Veeh R, Fux C, Hu FZ, Quigley M, Post JC: Role of biofilms in neurosurgical device-related infections. Neurosurg Rev 2005; 4:249-55. Braxton EE, Wohlfeld BJ, Blumenthal S, Bozzio, A, Butterman G, Guyer R, Idema J, Laich D, Morreale J, Nikolakis M, Patel A, Price JS, Witt J, Zigler J, Martin M. Postoperative Care Pathways Following Lumbar Total Disc Replacement Results of a Modified Delphi Approach. Spine J. 2019 Dec 15 Vol 43 Braxton, E. E., Brena, K. R., Spears, H., Conrad, E., & Heinze, J. D. (2022). Ultrasound- guided bilateral erector spinae plane nerve blocks: a novel application for the management of acute postoperative pain in awake spine surgery. Illustrative case. Journal of Neurosurgery: Case Lessons 3.18 (2022), CASE21633. Web. 16 May. 2022. Coric, D., Zigler, J., Derman, P., Braxton, E., Situ, A., & Patel, L. (2021). Predictors of long-term clinical outcomes in adult patients after lumbar total disc replacement: development and validation of a prediction model. J Neurosurg Spine, 1-9. Daya SK, Paulus AO, Braxton EE Jr, Vroman PJ, Mathis DA, Lin R, True MW. Delayed Diagnosis of TSH-Secreting Adenoma Attributed to Worsening Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in a Military Veteran Because of Provider Anchoring Bias. Mil Med. 2017 Mar;182(3): e1849-e1853. Lewandrowski, K. U., Moyano, J., Lorio, M. P., Ramírez León, J. F., Braxton, E., Menez, C., Martínez, C. R., Rugeles-Ortíz, J. G., Garcia, M. R., Telfeian, A. E., Duchen, L., Dowling, Á., & Yeung, A. (2022). Joint International SILACO, SICCMII, ISASS Symposium as a Model for a Collaborative Framework to Create Literature on Advances in Spine Surgery, Patient Care, and Policy. Int J Spine Surg, 16(5), 767-771. Lin RP Weitzel EK, Chen PG, McMains KC1, Chang DR, Braxton EE, Majors J, Bunegin L. Failure pressures after repairs of 2-cm × 2.5-cm rhinologic dural defects in a porcine ex vivo model. Int Forum Allergy Rhinol. 2016 Jun 9. Miranda LB, Braxton EE, Hobbs J, Quigley MR., Chronic subdural hematoma in the elderly: not a benign disease. J Neurosurg. 2010 Sep 24. O'Neill BR, Velez DA, Braxton EE, Whiting D, Oh MY. A survey of ventriculostomy and intracranial pressure monitor placement practices. Surg Neurol. 2008;70:268-73. Radcliff, K., Zigler, J., Braxton, E., Buttermann, G., Coric, D., Derman, P., Garcia, R., Jorgensen, A., Ferko, N. C., Situ, A., & Yue, J. (2021). Final long-term reporting from a randomized controlled IDE trial for lumbar artificial discs in single-level degenerative disc disease: 7-year results. Int J Spine Surg, 15(4), 612-632. Stoodley P, Braxton EE, Nistico L, Hall-Stoodley L, Johnson S, Quigley M, Post JC, Ehrlich GD, Kathju S. Direct demonstration of a Staphylococcus biofilm in an external ventricular drain in a patient with a history of recurrent ventriculoperitoneal shunt failure. Surg Neurol. 2010: 46; 127-32 Vargas RAA, Moscatelli M, Vaz de Lima M, Ramírez León JF, Lorio MP, Fiorelli RKA, Telfeian AE, Fiallos J, Braxton E, Song M, Lewandrowski K-U. Clinical Consequences of Incidental Durotomy during Full-Endoscopic Lumbar Decompression Surgery in Relation to Intraoperative Epidural Pressure Measurements. Journal of Personalized Medicine. 2023; 13(3):381. Vargas RA, De Olinveira EM, Moscatelli M, Ramírez León JF, Lorio MP, Fiorelli RK, Telfeian AE, Braxton E, Song M, Lewandrowski K-U. Identification of the Magna Radicular Artery Entry Foramen and Adamkiewicz System: Patient Selection for Open versus Full-Endoscopic Thoracic Spinal Decompression Surgery. Journal of Personalized Medicine. 2023; 13(2):356. Volner, KD, Lawson, BK, Braxton, EE,, Anderson, ER., Improvised interbody fusion cage in an austere medical environment. Spine J. 2015 Apr 1;15(4):785-7. Willson, T. J., Grady, C., Braxton, E., & Weitzel, E. Air Travel with Known Pneumocephalus Following Outpatient Sinus Surgery. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine 2014 85(1), 75-77.
  • Professional Societies
    American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons International Congress of Joint Reconstruction American Medical Association AO North America Colorado Medical Society Alumni Association of Loma Linda University School of Medicine Advance Trauma Life Support
  • Certifications
    Diplomat of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery
  • Hospital Affiliations
    St. Anthony Summit Medical Center Vail Valley Medical Center University of Colorado Hospital Peak One Surgery Center Vail Valley Surgery Centers
  • Education
    Bachelor of Science in Biology: Walla Walla University, College Place, WA Doctor of Medicine: Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA Surgery Residency: University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO Orthopaedic Residency: Geisinger Orthopaedic Institute, Danville, PA Joints and Adult Reconstruction Fellowship: University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO
  • Professional Affiliations
    American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons International Congress of Joint Reconstruction American Medical Association AO North America Colorado Medical Society Alumni Association of Loma Linda University School of Medicine Advance Trauma Life Support
  • Team Affiliations
    ​​US Ski Team Team Summit Colorado
  • Articles
    ​​Hamstring Tensioning in ACL Reconstruction Gait Analysis and Biomechanics of Unicompartmental Arthroplasty of the Knee Fixation of Proximal Humerus Fractures Book Chapter on Shoulder Biomechanics
  • Certifications
    Board Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery
  • Hospital Affiliations
    Vail Valley Medical CenterSummit Medical Center Vail Valley Surgery Center Peak One Surgery Center
  • Professional Societies
    Chief of Surgery, Vail Valley Medical Center Team Physician, US Ski Team Team Physician, Vail Christian High School Team Physician, Vail Yeti's Semi Pro Hockey Team
  • Team Affiliations
    US Ski Team Vail Christian High School Summit High School
  • Education
    Bachelor of Arts in English: Amherst College, Amherst, MA Doctor of Medicine: University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA General Surgery Internship: University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT Orthopaedic Surgery Residency: University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship: University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Professional Affiliations
    American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Arthroscopy Association of North America Colorado Orthopaedic Society
  • Team Affiliations
    US Ski Team Team Summit: Medical Director
  • Professional Societies
    Team Physician, US Ski Team Medical Advisory Committee, Peak One Surgery Center Visiting Assistant Professor, Western University Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Virginia Peer Review Committee, Summit Medical Center
  • Education
    Bachelor of Arts in Sociology: Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT Pre-Medical Education: University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO Doctor of Medicine: University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO Orthopaedic Surgery Residency: University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery Fellowship: Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC
  • Certifications
    Board Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Certificate of Added Qualification (CAQ) in Surgery of the Hand
  • Professional Affiliations
    American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Arthroscopy Association of North America American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Hawkins Shoulder Society AO Alumni Association
  • Recognition
    2015: Highest Patient Satisfaction Score, Summit Medical Center 2015: 2nd Place Age 40-50 Leadvill e 100 Mountain Bike Race 2014: Subspecialty Certificate for Surgery of the Hand 2013: 4th Place Age 40-50 Leadville 100 Mountain Bike Race 2013: 1st Place Grand Fondo Division Mount Evans Hill Climb Bike Race 2004-2008: Numerous Journal Publications, Book Chapters and Invited Articles 2005: 4th Annual AOA-OREF-Zimmer Resident Leadership Award 2004: UVA Award for Highest Orthopedic In-Training Exam Score 2003: Junior Resident of the Year, University of Virginia, Department of Orthopedics 2000: Award for Academic Excellence during second year medical school 1998: First Place: World Alpine Synchro Ski Championships 1994: Community Service Award for work with Building With
  • Articles
    Schoderbek RJ, Battaglia TC, Dorf ER, Kahler DM. Traumatic hemipelvectomy: case report and literature review. Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2005 Jun; 125(5): 358-62. Dorf E, Belzile E, Foster W. Chondrosarcoma Adjacent to Total Knee Arthroplasty Presenting as Osteolysis. The Journal of Arthroplasty. Accepted, in revision. Dorf E, Kuntz A, Kelsey J, Holstege CP. Lidocaine-induced altered mental status and seizure following hematoma block. J Emerg Me. J Emerg Med. 2006 Oct; 31(3): 251-3. Pannunzio M, MD , Dorf E MD, Chhabra AB, MD, Multiple Ganglion Cyst Formation on a Flexor Tendon After Surgical Release of a Trigger Finger: A Case Report. Am J Orthop. 2006 May; 35(5): 237-9. Dorf E MD, Chhabra AB MD A, McGinty J MD, Golish R MD, PhD, Pannunzio M MD, The Effect of Elbow Position on Grip Strength in the Evaluation of Lateral Epicondylitis. Journal of Hand Surg 2007; 32A: 882--886. University of Virginia, Department of Orthpaedics Intern Core Curriculum: An introduction to basic orthopedic principles through a selective literature review. Conceived and edited by Dorf E MD. Approved by faculty and incorporated into resident educational curriculum June
  • Professional Affiliations
    American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society
  • Research
    Resident Research Project, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, Texas. Analysis of Resident's Ridge and the Functional Anatomy of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament, and anatomic study using arthroscopy and MRI data; Study of the use of Nitinol staples for vertebral body fixation, a porcine cadaveric study of the pullout strength of vertebral instrumentation augmented with Nitinol staples. Research Fellow, Graduate Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Clinical study of esophageal motility using esophageal manometry and multichannel intraluminal impedance. Research Associate, Sulzer Orthopedics Inc., Wheat Ridge, Colorado Coordinated clinical trials assessing efficacy of bone and meniscus allograft material. Development of in-vitro and in-vivo immunoassays, protein purification (Chromatography, Electrophoresis). Cell culture management and project development. Brigham Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, Technique for limited open Achilles tendon repair with ring forceps in the foot and ankle in the Foot and Ankle International (October 2010). The role of physical therapy after repair of achilles tendon ruptures
  • Recognition
    WSMRF Subspecialty Award, Western Student Medical Research Forum, 2003 Outstanding Research Poster Presentation, UCHSC Student Research Forum, 2001 Henry J. Tumen Research Fellowship, Gastroenterology, Graduate Hospital, 2001 Undergraduate Research Grant, University of Colorado, 1997, 1998, 1999 University of Colorado Study Abroad Scholarship, 1996 College of Engineering Dean's List, University of Colorado, Spring 1995, Fall 1996 Omega Chi Epsilon, Chemical Engineering Honor Society, 1995, 1999
  • Hospital Affiliations
    St. Anthony Summit Medical Center Vail Valley Medical Center Peak One Surgery Center Vail Valley Surgery Centers
  • Education
    Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering: University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO Doctor of Medicine: University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO Orthopaedic Surgery Residency: The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX Foot and Ankle Fellowship: Harvard, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA
  • Certifications
    ​​ Board Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery
  • Certifications
    Board Certified - American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Registered in Musculoskeletal® (RMSK®) sonography certification
  • Research
    2016-2018 Resident Research: Determining risk factors for injury and prognostic factors for recovery in high school sports injuries as part of the National High School-Related Injury Surveillance Study. Mentor: Scott Laker, MD, University of Colorado 2009-2012 Graduate Research: Investigation of neuroanatomical and functional endophenotypes in the development of schizophrenia. Mentor: Wendy Kates, PhD. Upstate Medical University 2005-2009 Undergraduate Research Assistant: Characterization of the light-dependent magnetic compass orientation behavior of Drosophila melanogaster. Mentor: John Phillips, PhD, Virginia Tech
  • Professional Affiliations
    2017 North American Spine Society: Member In-Training 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation: Fellow Member 2014 Alpha Omega Alpha National Honor Society: Member, Upstate Medical University Gamma Chapter 2009 Phi Beta Kappa National Honor Society: Member, Virginia Tech Chapter 2009 Phi Kappa Phi National Honor Society: Member, Virginia Tech Chapter
  • Education
    Fellowship In Sports And Spine Medicine: Marko Bodor, Md Napa, California Residency In Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation: University Hospital, University Of Colorado, Denver, Colorado Doctor Of Medicine: Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York Bachelor Of Science In Biological Sciences: Summa Cum Laude, Virginia Polytechnic Institute And State University (Virginia Tech) Blacksburg, Virginia
  • Research
    Complications of scoliosis surgery in patients with intretheal baclofen pump Patterns of orthopedic in jury: snowboarding versus skiing Arthroscopic Correlation of TFCC tears and MRI findings
  • Certifications
    Board Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery
  • Education
    Bachelor of Science in Biology: Vanderbilt University, NashvilleTN University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO Doctor of Medicine: LSU Health Shreveport School of Medicine, Shreveport, LA Orthopaedic Surgery Residency: LSU Health New Orleans, New Orleans, LA Sports Orthopaedic Fellowship: Eastwood Orthopaedic Clinic, Auckland, New Zealand Upper Extremity Orthopaedic Fellowship: Auckland Bone and Joint Surgery, Auckland, New Zealand Hand Surgery Fellowship: The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
  • Professional Affiliations
    American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons American Medical Association American Society for Surgery of the Hand Arthroscopy Association of North America
  • Education
    Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology: University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine: Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Lauderdale, FL Internship: Suncoast Hospital, Largo, FL Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residency: Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL Sports Medicine Fellowship: Lutheran General Hospital Sports Medicine Center, Park Ridge, IL
  • Professional Affiliations
    American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Spinal Intervention Society (SIS)
  • Certifications
    Board Certification: American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Board Certification: American Osteopathic College of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Certificate of Added Qualification in Pain Management Maintained Subspecialty Certification in Pain Medicine since 2000
  • Team Affiliations
    US Ski Team Summit County Team Physician Team Summit Colorado Team Breckenridge Sports Club
  • Certifications
    Board Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery
  • Hospital Affiliations
    St. Anthony Summit Medical Center Vail Health Hospital Middle Park Health Peak One Surgery Center Vail Valley Surgery Centers
  • Professional Affiliations
    American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Arthroscopy Association of North America American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons AO North America Reviewer: American Journal of Sports Medicine Reviewer: Arthroscopy Journal
  • Education
    Undergraduate Education: University Of Texas At Austin Medical School: University Of Texas’ Utsouthwestern Medical Center Orthopedic Residency: The University Of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital Fellowship: Steadman-Philippon Research Institute
  • Education
    Undergraduate Education: University Of California At San Diego, Biochemistry Medical School: University Of California At Davis Orthopedic Residency: University Of California At Davis Fellowship: Knee And Shoulder Sports Medicine, Steadman Hawkins Clinic, Vail, Colorado
  • Hospital Affiliations
    Vail Valley Medical Center Vail Valley Surgery Center
  • Certifications
    Board Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Certificate of Added Qualification in Orthopaedic Sports Medicine
  • Team Affiliations
    US Women's Alpine Ski Team, Head Team Physician United States Olympic Committee Team Physician
  • Professional Affiliations
    American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Arthroscopy Association of North America American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Hawkins Shoulder Society AO Alumni Association
  • Articles
    31 Peer Review Research Articles 15 Orthopedic Book Chapters 14 Surgical Technique Videos for the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons
  • Certifications
    Diplomat of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery
  • Education
    Undergraduate School: B.S., Chemical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder (2001) Graduate School: M.A., Biology, Magna Cum Laude, Loyola University, Chicago, IL (2011) Medical School: M.D., Cum Laude, Loyola Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL (2016) Orthopaedic Surgery Residency: University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO (2016-2021) Orthopaedic Surgery Adult Reconstruction Fellowship: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (2021-2022)
  • Education
    Undergraduate School: B.S., Bachelor of Science in Human Biology , Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (2018) Graduate School: D.P.T., Washington University, St Louis, MO (2021)
  • Professional Affiliations
    American Physical Therapy Association; Colorado Chapter
  • Certifications
    Functional Dry Needling Level 1: Kinetacore 2021
  • Professional Affiliations
    American Physical Therapy Association; Colorado Chapter
  • Education
    Undergraduate School: B.S., Health and Exercise Science with Concentration in Sports Medicine, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (2012) Graduate School: D.P.T., University of Colorado Denver Anschutz Medical Center, Aurora, CO (2016)
  • Certifications
    Titleist Performance Institute Medical 2 Certified (2016) Functional Dry Needling Level 2: Kinetacore; (2019) Functional Dry Needling Level 1: Kinetacore (2018)
  • Presentations
    Injury Prevention for Golfers for the Colorado PGA Western Slope Conference (2019)
  • Hospital Affiliations
    Middle Park Health Vail Health Hospital Vail Valley Surgery Centers Dillion Surgery Center
  • Professional Affiliations
    American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Arthroscopy Association of North America American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Western U COMP-NW Class of 2016 Ambassador Vail Christian High School Class of 2004 Ambassador
  • Education
    Undergraduate School: B.A., English, University of Colorado (2008) Medical School: Western University of Health Sciences COMP-Northwest (2016) Orthopaedic Surgery Residency: Cleveland Clinic Foundation — South Pointe Hospital (2016-2021) Sports Medicine Fellowship: Hoag Orthopedic Institute (2021-2022)
  • Education
    Undergraduate: Bachelor of Arts, Biology, 1984; Colorado College, Graduate: Colorado Springs, CO MD, 1990 University of Colorado Health Science Center, Aurora Colorado Internship: General Surgery, 1991 University of Colorado, Aurora, CO Residency: Orthopaedic Surgery, 1995, University of Colorado, Orthopaedic Surgery, Aurora, CO Fellowship: Adult Reconstruction, 1995, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO
  • Contrast:
    In some cases, we may need to inject contrast. If that is the case, you may need to have lab work done. VSON uses MultiHance and Prohace, which are Class II agents and are proven safe and effective If you have concerns or questions, please ask the tech at the time of scheduling. Studies using contrast will take longer as they require before and after injection pictures.
  • Once You Arrive:
    Please arrive at least 15 minutes prior to your exam. You will need to fill out forms related to MRI that will ask you questions regarding metal or other implants in your body. If you arrive and have something that we need to research, your appointment may need to be rescheduled. If you arrive later than 15 minutes for your scheduled exam, your appointment may need to be rescheduled. When you are ready to enter the scan room, you will be asked to lie on the table – either head or feet first, depending on the type of exam. The table will then move your body part of interest to the center of the bore. Once you are positioned appropriately, you will be given head phones or other ear protection, a blanket (if needed), then the tech will leave the room and communicate via intercom.
  • What to Wear:
    You CAN wear loose cotton clothing. Please make sure that your clothing does NOT contain: Zippers, Snaps, Buttons, Underwire, Metallic thread, or anything metallic in nature. Your MRI tech will evaluate your clothing upon arrival and provide shorts and/or a gown if needed. Additionally, you will need to remove items such as, Jewelry, Piercings, Glasses, Medication patches, Dentures, Loose change, Wallets, Credit cards, Wigs, etc. Please leave any personal valuables at home. If you should need, a secure locker space will be available.
  • When Scheduling:
    Please inform your MRI scheduling representative if you have any metal or implants in your body from a previous surgery, including the following Cardiac Brain Orthopaedic Abdominal There are contraindications specific to VSON (pacemaker, defibrillator, and some Brain Aneurysm clips, among others).For MR Conditional implants, you will need to provide your implants' MRI compatibility for things like: cardiac STENT, mechanical valve, Cardiac devices specific to loop recorders, Spinal Cord Stimulator devices, etc. Please make sure to provide a copy of the information for our records. If you have ever had metal in your eyes (even if it was removed), we may need orbit x-rays for clearance. Most MRI scans are scheduled for 45 minutes each. It will be longer if there are multiple areas. If you are having three or more scans done, you may need to consider scheduling them on separate days. If you are claustrophobic, please inform your ordering doctor and the MRI tech. There are medications that can be prescribed for a more pleasant experience. Additionally, you will need to have someone available to drive you on the day of your exam. Please keep in mind; we will do everything we can to keep you as comfortable as possible. If you are on medications, you may continue to take them as prescribed. If you have pain medication, you should also take these so your exam will be more comfortable, as you will need to be still during the entire exam.

Qualifications

bottom of page